Oriori no Uta : Poems for All Seasons

It`s a fact: autumn’s

here. To the eye it’s still not

quite apparent, but

with the sound of the wind, I

suddenly became aware.

Fujiwara no Toshiyuki

Kokinsyū, the first poem on the coming of autumn. Odoroku: “to suddenly notice, become aware.” Autumn changes are not clearly visible in the landscape yet, but the sound of the wind announces the new season. The fulcrum of the poem is the discovery that before autumn becomes apparent to the eye, one knows of its arrival by the wind, which is a sign or portent. The flow of time, in other words, is perceived not by the eye but by the ear, in a very introspective mode of feeling. This had an influence on aesthetics even in later ages.

 

(Aki)来ぬ(kinu)(to) (me)(ni)(wa)さやか(sayaka)(ni) 見えねども(mienedomo) (kaze)(no)おと(oto)(ni)(zo) おどろかれぬる(odorokarenuru)

藤原敏行(ふじわらの としゆき)

『古今集』秋歌巻頭の立秋の歌。「おどろく」はにわかに気づく。まだ目にはありありと見えないが、ああもう風の音が秋をつげている。目に見えるものより先に、「風」という「気配」によって秋の到来を知るという発見が、この有名な歌のかなめである。つまり「時」の移り行きを目ではなく耳で聴き取る行き方で、より内面的な感じ方である。これが後世の美学にも影響を与えたのだった。